Tea Mail – October 2004

This is yet another ‘mammoth’ edition…. but we make no apologies for bringing you more news than any other tea newsletter!

green-ball.gif The Big Tea Health News in September
There was a lot to get excited about in the world of tea health this September. A report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition by a team from the University of Hong Kong [8] who were examining the effect of EGCG, one of tea’s famous antioxidants, stated that green tea polyphenols reduced the severity of liver injury in mice. Researchers at the world famous Mayo Clinic [7] have found that another component in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, helps kill the most common form of leukemia in the United States. A Taiwanese study [6], published in The Archives of Internal Medicine, found that people who drank tea regularly had lower blood pressure than those who didn’t. And finally, researchers at Curtin University, Perth, Australia [5], who previously found that green tea could prevent ovarian and prostate cancers, said their new study showed it could also help women with ovarian cancer to survive longer. The startling results have just been published in the prestigious International Journal of Cancer.

green-ball.gif Other Tea Headlines in September
One of the biggest events in the tea world [4], the Eighth International Tea Culture Seminar, was joined by the First Mengding Mountain International Tea Culture Tourism Festival at the world famous tea growing region in the western part of Southwest China’s Sichuan Province. The two events drew 2,400 people from 20 countries and regions, 700 more than expected. The biennial International Tea Culture Seminar was started by the China International Tea Culture Research Institute. As the highest-ranking meeting of its kind in the tea industry, it has been held seven times since 1990. The venues have included other famous locations in China such as Hangzhou, Changde, Kunming and Guangzhou. More than 20 cities from around the world competed to hold the Seminar, but Ya’an became the winner thanks to its long history of tea cultivation and unique tea culture. In 53 BC, Wu Lizhen, a farmer in Ya’an, planted seven tea trees on Mengding Mountain, allegedly the first tea trees ever planted by a human being. Since then, Mengding Mountain has been hailed as the origin of Chinese tea culture. Spreading its influence near and far, Mengding has become a sacred mountain in the world of tea.

At Seven Cups we are proud to be associated with the legendary Meng Ding teas – we have EXCLUSIVE rights to export from Meng Ding Farm, so you will not find these historic teas anywhere else.

Take a look at Seven Cups’ EXCLUSIVE Meng Ding Green Teas and Yellow Tea

We have also included an excellent article from the Epoch Times [2] in its entirety – it’s a lengthy piece, but we recommend that you all read it, as it is very thoughtfully written and researched, and it manages to convey some of the spiritual nature of drinking and appreciating fine teas. It also goes some way to explaining why the sort of teas you can find in the Seven Cups range, which are grown on misty mountains in the heart of China, are so sought after and different from the run of the mill teas you may find elsewhere.

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [1]

The Proof Is In: Drinking Tea Is Healthy
NewsWise.com, 30 Sept 2004

Although tea drinking has been associated with health benefits for centuries, only in recent years have its medicinal properties been investigated scientifically. The October issue of Harvard Women’s Health Watch recognizes the healthy power of tea while helping readers get the most out of their cups.

Tea’s health benefits are largely due to its high content of flavonoids—plant-derived compounds that are antioxidants. Green tea is the best food source of a group called catechins. In test tubes, catechins are more powerful than vitamins C and E in halting oxidative damage to cells and appear to have other disease-fighting properties. Studies have found an association between consuming green tea and a reduced risk for several cancers, including, skin, breast, lung, colon, esophageal, and bladder.

Additional benefits for regular consumers of green and black teas include a reduced risk for heart disease. The antioxidants in green, black, and oolong teas can help block the oxidation of LDL (bad) cholesterol, increase HDL (good) cholesterol and improve artery function. A Chinese study published recently in the Archives of Internal Medicine showed a 46%-65% reduction in hypertension risk in regular consumers of oolong or green tea, compared to non-consumers of tea.

The October issue provides a few tips to get the most out of tea-drinking:

• Drinking a cup of tea a few times a day to absorb antioxidants and other healthful plant compounds. In green-tea drinking cultures, the usual amount is three cups per day.
• The best way to get the catechins and other flavonoids in tea is to drink it freshly brewed. Decaffeinated, bottled ready-to-drink tea preparations, and instant teas have less of these compounds.

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [2]

Green Tea: A Long and Flavorful History
EpochTimes.com, 28 Sept 2004

Scientists have long known that drinking green tea has immense health benefits because it contains many micronutrients vital for keeping bodies healthy. An article in the Journal of Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 26, from 1975 entitled, “The Nutritional and Therapeutic Value of Tea†has this to say about green tea: “Green tea contains vitamin C in amounts comparable to lemon; vitamins K and P (bioflavonoids) comparable to green vegetables… comparable to spinach and beta-carotene found in carrots. It strengthens the blood vessels, has anti-inflammatory properties and the polyphenols (essential micronutrients) act synergistically with ascorbic acid (vitamin C), improve resistance to infection. Green tea is also high in folic acid.†The article continues: “Green tea is the cup that cheers, for aiding digestion, normalizing thyroid function, protects against leukemia after exposure to radiation.â€

The latest research finding suggests that green tea consumption forestalls development of prostate cancer and inhibits tumor growth. A 1991 Japan tea symposium hailed “the green†benefits even more. Scientists have proven that “consumption of the phenols inherent in green tea will destroy free radicals (those atoms in the body missing an unpaired electron that cause diseases), making the micronutrients in green tea ideal antioxidants, meaning the properties in green tea act as a disease preventative.†(Professor Hasan Mukthar, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland/Ohio)

During a subsequent tea forum in Shizuoka, Japan in 1999, professor Mukthar concluded by saying: “…thus, medical research is confirming the ancient oriental wisdom, that therapy for many diseases may reside in a teapot.â€

Just what is it that has made the drinking of Camellia sinensis so enduring for thousands of years?

Tea lore abounds. Origins of tea-brewing stories vary, depending on who does the telling. People have sung the praise of tea for millennia. Emperor Chien Lung (1710-1799) who lived during the Manchu Dynasty expressed his fondness this way: “You can taste and feel but not describe the exquisite state of repose produced by tea, that precious drink which drives away the five causes of sorrow.â€

Others throughout history, the lowly and highborn, have documented and are today again lauding the benefits of this ancient beverage. China grows the bulk of all teas consumed in the world.

Camellia sinensis can grow as tall as 30 feet. When the shrub is cultivated for tea leaves and not for lumber, as it is in parts of Malaysia, the shrub is pruned into bush form, not more than five feet tall, allowing the picker to reach every branch, and permitting the plant to expend its energy to produce leaves instead of woody growth. Regular pruning every three years keeps the shrubs at the desired height. All teas marketed come from this plant, but the types of tea, as varied as people’s personalities, depend on several other factors. The quality of tea depends on stringent cultivation.

Ancient Chinese stories relate that formerly only highly moral, virgin women were chosen to harvest tea. Tea flourishes at elevations of up to 6,000 feet. Tea planters claim the lower the elevation, the tougher the leaves of the bush. Connoisseurs insist that teas grown at high altitudes have the most desirable flavors. Teas grown at such heights are also costlier than those from lower fields because the terrain makes them more labor-intensive to bring to market.

The renowned Lu Yun, writer of the Ch’a Ching (The Tea Classic), asserted in 780 A.D. that tea cultivation in China started by around 350 A.D. His estimate is refuted, however, by an entry from a 350 A.D. Chinese dictionary that already told of much earlier tea cultivation. Even before it was extensively cultivated for use as an everyday drink, the Chinese had used tea as medicine.

Lin Yutang, a modern Chinese scholar, related a story that was discovered from around 307 A.D., telling of many Chinese fleeing the invaders from the north. They came across the Yangtze River to the Wu region, the area now called Shanghai, where street stalls already sold tea to passers-by. Other records hailing from that period disclosed that tea has since then become an integral part of daily Chinese life. But not all could afford the choicest teas or the best water for its preparation. Some even made do with the sweepings from the tearoom floor and brackish water.

From a tale entitled “Through a Moon Gate,†by L.Z. Yuan we learn that Chien Lung, the famous 18th century Ching Dynasty emperor, demanded not only the best leaf but also the best grade of water for brewing. While emperor Chien Lung toured his various realms, he rated the water quality of their fountains according to suitability for tea making and concluded that, “the lightest water is best for tea-making.†His prize went to the Jade Fountain outside Beijing, because “the water is the quality of melted snow.â€

Melted snow for tea water is the topic in another story, that of an anonymous writer from the 16th century. In his novel Ching Ping Mei, Moon Lady, a character in the story, goes into the snow-covered courtyard, sweeps a portion of snow from the path and heats it in the tea kettle. To brew her tea, she uses a special tea blend, “noble Phoenix and mild Lark’s tongue.†The brew enraptures the guests, compelling one of them to pen this poem in gratitude:

In the jasper crock
Light puffs of crystalline vapor,
From the golden bowls
A wild, rare fragrance mounts.â€

Those “golden†bowls may have been poetic license, or the term could have referred to the glaze on the teacup, because no Chinese person would drink tea from a metal cup, unless in dire circumstances. The earliest teacups were pottery and later porcelain, around which a whole industry developed. The wealthy could afford the finest porcelains from the choicest manufacturer, adorned with exquisite glazes and delicate designs. But other materials for teacups have also been used, as gleaned from a passage in the famous 18th century novel “Dream of the Red Chamber,†by Ts’ao Hsueh-Chi’n, where we are regaled about a nun offering tea to guests:

The matriarch asked her what it was and the nun answered that it was rainwater saved from the year before. … The nun then took Precious Virtue and Black Jade into another room and made a special tea for them. She poured the tea into two different cups … of the rare Sung period. Her own cup was of white jade.â€

Several dynasties were renowned for their porcelain, but none more so than the Ming Dynasty. Teacups from that era were and are still highly prized. Some survive as rare museum pieces, unequalled in workmanship, glazes and shape. Tea is indigenous to China, although 30 other countries also grow tea. The most recognized are India, Japan, Taiwan, East Africa, Russia and the former Ceylon, now called Sri Lanka. India is the largest exporter of a tea crop.

What accounts for these variations in flavors?

The answer is the soil, proper moisture at the correct time and the methods of wilting, harvesting, curing, drying, fermenting, blending and sorting the leaves into the marketable product. China teas come primarily from five provinces, Yunnan being the originator of the choicest teas because of the province’s proximity to the Himalayas. Picked at high altitudes, it is free of astringency and full of rich flavor. It is expensive, but a scant spoonful brews a nice pot. The four other tea-producing provinces, located in Eastern China, are Anhui, known for black Keemun tea, said to have an almost chocolaty aftertaste; Fujian and Jiangxi (black teas, used primarily in tea blends) and the province of Zhejiang, reputed for its gunpowder teas, a green variety. The leaves are rolled to look like tiny gun pellets, hence the name.

All teas are harvested from the same plants. The differences arise from the types of the harvested tealeaves themselves and their processes of withering, drying, oxidizing/fermenting, smoking, roasting and packing. The choicest and most expensive teas are prepared from the first three leaves, including the unripe tip at the top of the plant, harvested at exactly the right time. Lesser qualities are from the next two leaves down on the branch. Three main types of tea are available – non-fermented green tea, black tea, fermented and oolong (meaning Black Dragon), a semi-fermented tea, manufactured mainly in Taiwan. “Chinese oolong tea is not one tea, but many different teas,†according to the Tea World Web site.

There can be found a description of how Chinese oolong teas are prepared for consumption, the different examples of oolong, what accounts for the myriad of coloring in the brewed tea and charming tea lore. It also lists exhaustive information regarding flavored Chinese teas.

Green tea is actually fired, meaning the leaves are placed in a large iron basin for 20-30 seconds and heated to boiling. This operation destroys the enzymes in the leaves that cause fermentation. This process of firing renders the leaves a green color.

The flavor of green tea depends on the choice of the leaves used, the growing region and the period of storage. A Chinese friend relates that tealeaves that have been stored too long can be “revived†by heating them in the oven for a while before brewing. This, when brewed, would result in a better cup of old tea.

A cup of Camellia sinensis, anyone?

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [3]

Green tea extract keeps arteries unclogged
BruDirect.com, 20 Sept 2004

Green tea may hold the key to keeping hearts clog-free. Powerful antioxidants make up a third of the weight of dried tea leaves. The main one of these good-for-you compounds is called EGCG (or, if you’re good at tongue twisters, epigallocatechin-3-gallate). New mouse studies show that EGCG can slow the build-up of artery-clogging plaque. Yes, you’ve heard something like this before. Animal studies often show that antioxidants keep arteries from clogging. Human trials, however, are often disappointing.

That may soon change. What’s different about this study is that it indicates the timing of green-tea-extract treatment makes a world of difference. Cardiologist Kuang-Yuh Chyu, MD, PhD, of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, and colleagues report the findings in the May 25 issue of Circulation. “Most animal experiments evaluating the effects of antioxidants are started when the animals are young. Randomized clinical trials typically enroll adult patients with varying stages of plaques,” Chyu says in a news release. “This discrepancy supports speculation that antioxidant treatment affects early but not later stages of plaque development.”

Chyu’s team studied mice fed a high-cholesterol diet and then given a plaque-inducing injury to their main heart artery. After the plaque-induced injury, some of the animals started getting injections of the green tea extract EGCG. It worked. On day 21, the animals had 55% less plaque than those animals not given green tea extracts. By day 42, they had 73% less plaque. But the treatment had no effect when given to animals with fully mature plaque.

“It appears that antioxidant therapy would have therapeutic benefits only if initiated during a critical window very early in the formation of plaque,” Chyu says. Prediman K. Shah, MD, the study’s senior researcher and director of the Cedars-Sinai cardiology division, says the findings move scientists closer to finding ways of preventing human heart disease. “We look forward to developing and fine-tuning innovative prevention and treatment techniques in the future,” Shah says in a news release.

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [4]

Tea seminar starts
ChinaDaily.com, 20 Sept 2004

It was unexpectedly sunny yesterday in this city in the western part of Southwest China’s Sichuan Province as the curtain was raised on the Eighth International Tea Culture Seminar and the First Mengding Mountain International Tea Culture Tourism Festival.

On till September 25, the two events have drawn 2,400 people from 20 countries and regions, 700 more than expected. Some 400 are foreign officials and tea experts, said Hou Xiongfei, Party secretary of Ya’an.

The seminar, which will publish the “Mengding Mountain Declaration of World Tea Culture,” will be western China’s first international event featuring tea culture. The biennial International Tea Culture Seminar was started by the China International Tea Culture Research Institute.

As the highest-ranking meeting of its kind in the tea industry, it has been held seven times since 1990. The venues have included Hangzhou, Changde, Kunming and Guangzhou in China, Seoul in South Korea and Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia.

More than 20 cities from around the world competed to hold the Eighth International Tea Culture Seminar. But Ya’an became the winner thanks to its long history of tea cultivation and unique tea culture.

In 53 BC, Wu Lizhen, a farmer in Ya’an, planted seven tea trees on Mengding Mountain. According to historical records, they were allegedly the first tea trees ever planted by a human being. Since then, Mengding Mountain has been hailed as the origin of Chinese tea culture and Wu has been referred to as the “ancestor of tea.” Spreading its influence near and far, Mengding has become a sacred mountain in the world of tea.

With Mengding Mountain as the centre, Ya’an has built 22,667 hectares of tea gardens and is a major tea producer in Sichuan.

Take a look at Seven Cups’ EXCLUSIVE Meng Ding Green Teas and Yellow Tea

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [5]

Green tea halves ovarian toll
TheWest.com (Australia), 10 Sept 2004

Women with ovarian cancer who drink antioxidant-rich green tea can halve their risk of dying from the disease, a ground-breaking Perth study shows. Curtin University researchers, who previously found that green tea could prevent ovarian and prostate cancers, said their new study showed it could also help women with ovarian cancer to survive longer. The startling results have just been published in the prestigious International Journal of Cancer.

Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer among Australian women but the leading cause of death of all gynaecological cancers. Associate Professor Andy Lee, Professor Colin Binns and Dr Min Zhang from Curtin’s school of public health looked at 254 Chinese women with ovarian cancer. They found those women who drank green tea had half the risk of dying of the cancer than non-tea drinkers. Women who drank tea regularly – at least one cup a day – had their risk of dying of ovarian cancer reduced by 60 per cent.

Professor Lee said although the study looked at green tea, women who drank the black tea variety could expect to get similar benefits. “We have previously shown that drinking green tea prevents ovarian cancer but this new research shows it can also increase survival in women with the cancer,” he said.

“Regular consumption slows down the growth of human cancer cells because the tea’s potent antioxidants cause the cell cycle to stop. I recommend drinking at least one cup of green tea each day without adding milk or sugar.

“We have long been aware of the beneficial effects of green tea under experimental conditions but this is the first real evidence that its consumption really enhances survival in women with ovarian cancer.”

Professor Lee said there was growing evidence of the health benefits of drinking green tea for men and women. He said people should consider replacing their mid-morning cup of coffee with green tea. The research, which was funded by the WA Cancer Council, was carried out in China where there is a low incidence of ovarian cancer and a high consumption of green tea. Cancer Council chief executive officer Susan Rooney welcomed the findings and said the results were encouraging.

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [6]

Regular tea-drinkers may benefit, study says
IndyStar.com, 10 Sept 2004

A Taiwanese study found that people who drank tea regularly had lower blood pressure than those who didn’t. The authors of the study, in The Archives of Internal Medicine, noted that their research did not prove any cause-and-effect relationship.

In Taiwan, the habitual tea drinkers among the randomly chosen sample of 1,500 healthy men and women tended to be fatter and more likely to smoke, drink alcohol and consume salt, and were less likely to eat vegetables. Nevertheless, blood pressure measurements were lower among the tea drinkers.

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [7]

Component in Green Tea Helps Kill Leukemia Cells
NewsWise.com, 8 Sept 2004

There’s increasing evidence that green tea offers health benefits, reports the September issue of Mayo Clinic Women’s HealthSource. Recent studies have reported that polyphenols, compounds found in green tea, may offer protection against certain cancers and may aid in the destruction of cancer cells.

Now, Mayo Clinic researchers have found that another component in green tea helps kill the most common form of leukemia in the United States. The component, known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, kills leukemia cells by interrupting some of the communication signals they need to survive. Researchers studied cells taken from patients who have B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a noncurable form of the disease.

The study’s findings are a step toward more effective or easily tolerated therapies to prevent the disease from progressing. And, while it’s too early to recommend green tea to prevent or treat leukemia, drinking it is unlikely to cause health problems.

More…

green-ball.gif Latest Tea News [8]

Green tea extract fights liver damage in mice
FoodNavigator.com, 7 Sept 2004

Green tea polyphenols reduced the severity of liver injury in a new study on mice. The researchers say the ingredient could be useful in the treatment of liver disease.

While the findings have not been confirmed in humans, they do support previous animal research showing that the polyphenols protected the liver from damage. Continuing research supports green tea’s reputation as a disease-fighter.

Pure ECEG (epigallocatechin gallate) extract, the major polyphenol in green tea and used in much of the research, is not yet available in Europe but the beverage is becoming fashionable, boosted by the wealth of research on green tea and the shift in sales in recent years to flavoursome or healthy alternative teas. According to market analysts Datamonitor, green tea consumption in 2002 was more than 20 times the 1997 figure.

In the new study, a team from the University of Hong Kong examined the effect of EGCG on mice treated with carbon tetrachloride, a model of liver injury. Two different doses of EGCG were tested on measures of free radical production and increases in lipid peroxidation and compared with a control group. The EGCG administration led to a dose-dependent decrease in all of the variables of liver injury observed in the carbon tetrachloride–treated mice, write the researchers in this month’s American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

More…

green-ball.gifFeatured teas for October – and special deals on Buddha’s Eyebrow Green Tea
Each month we feature three of our teas – a chance to learn more about these varieties. For October, we have chosen one oolong tea, one black tea and one green tea.

1) Taishan Buddha’s Eyebrow Green Tea – VERY SPECIAL OFFER: OCTOBER ONLY!

Seven Cups Organic Taishan Green Tea is named ‘Buddha’s Eyebrow’ because of the leaf shape, which is thick and curly. The aroma is wonderful, and it has a more robust, full flavor than some of our other green teas. This is an incredibly popular tea – in fact, it’s the tea most commonly consumed in China, because of its favorable balance of great taste and very reasonable price. Our special deals, valid only for October 2004, make Buddha’s Eyebrow an even more attractive tea for everyday drinking – a genuinely high quality green tea at a remarkably low price!

50g (1¾oz) – was $5.99, this month only $4.99
100g (3½oz) – was $10.99, this month only $9.49
500g (1.1lb) – was $46.99, this month only $39.99

2) Shui Xiang (Narcissus Water Fairy) WuYi Mountain Rock Oolong Tea

This is a wonderfully fragrant tea with a complicated taste for a ‘drink everyday’ tea. It comes from the WuYi Mountains in the northwest corner of Fujian and is related to the Phoenix Mountain oolongs that are so famous for their fragrance. The smell is like an fruity-orchid smell, with a sweet taste. The brew tea looks like honey. The fragrance is purely natural; it is not scented by narcissus flowers. The dry tea leaf is said to resemble a frogs leg in shape is dark green. The top three or four leaves are picked. This is a very popular tea is China and the eastern pacific rim countries. The WuYi Mountains have been recognized for over 1000 years as the home of the best teas in China. This tea has a Chinese Organic Certification and a pending USDA application. Our president, Austin Hodge, rates a tea of this quality at this price as ‘the deal of the century!’

3) Imperial Lapsang Black Tea – EXCLUSIVE to Seven Cups, direct from Lapsang Farm

Seven Cups Imperial Lapsang is the very best black tea to come from probably the world’s most famous tea farm, Lapsang in the legendary WuYi Mountains. Unlike our other two Lapsang black teas, this superior variety is not smoked. If you have never tried a fine loose leaf tea before, this would be a good place to start – you will not be able to look at those strange little tea bags that supposedly contain ‘black tea’ in the same light again! As with the original Lapsang Souchong, we have the exclusive right to export this tea, so our Imperial Lapsang will be a new and unique experience for you. It has organic certifications: from the IMO (Swiss), USDA (USA) and OTRDC (China).

green-ball.gifMore exciting new varieties of tea to join the Seven Cups range in October
We will have several new varieties making their debuts in October. They are all freshly picked and each one is an exciting addition to our ever improving range. Probably the biggest coup is our new TieGuanYin Oolong – as it is the first TieGuanYin to ever gain full organic certification. The intensive hand processing of this delicious variety have always hindered organic certification in the past, although all of our TieGuanYins are grown and manufactured using organic techniques. We have another new oolong arriving soon, this one a very interesting WuYi Cassia, or Cinnamon Oolong. We are expanding our Jasmine range, with three eagerly-anticipated styles – White Jasmine Balls with Lily and Osmanthus flowers, an even higher grade of White Jasmine Pearls, and a Jasmine variant of the pinnacle of white tea production, Silver Needle…

Take a leisurely stroll around our on-line store.

green-ball.gif The new Seven Cups ‘How to Buy Tea’ guide
Austin and Zhu Ping have written a rough guide on how to buy tea. Much of the information has been translated from the Chinese tea encyclopedia. The world of tea can be a daunting place for the beginner and tea aficionado alike, so a little help from the experts will be welcome for many. We hope that it will be useful for you when deciding on what to buy – but we need to hear your thoughts to make it as useful as possible. You can read the article here and then send us your feedback by sending Austin an email at sales@sevencups.com.

DON’T MISS THE
SEVEN CUPS TEA HOUSE
GRAND OPENING

to benefit the Academy for Cancer Wellness

Academy for Cancer Wellness

Seven Cups Tea House in Tucson, Arizona

Sunday, October 10th, 2004
Open house from 2:00pm to 6:00pm
Ticket price: $18.00 (tax deductible)

  • Ribbon Cutting Ceremony with the Tucson Chamber of Commerce
  • Photo signing: Theresa Nguyen, Miss Asia Arizona and Miss Asia International

  • Tea tasting accompanied by light refreshments

  • Lion dancers will perform an opening business ceremony

  • Internationally renowned Norman Walker Chinese Folk Dance Video

  • Teacher-choreographer from Cecily’s Dance Studio

  • Tai Chi demonstrations

  • Aleck McKinnon, Head Horticulturalist from Tucson Botanical Gardens will demonstrate and teach

Celebrating the Seven Cups Tea House Grand Opening – all proceeds from this event will benefit the Academy for Cancer Wellness to assist under-insured cancer patients. The Academy for Cancer Wellness is a 501(c)3 non-profit charitable organization. Its mission is to enhance the awareness of cancer champions (people who survive). Dr Alice F. Chang is a cancer survivor/champion who is a licensed psychologist specializing in health psychology.

For more information, please contact:

Dr Alice F. Chang, Academy for Cancer Wellness
AFChang@cancerhealth.org
(520) 722-4581
Austin Hodge, Seven Cups
sales@sevencups.com
(520) 881-4072

DON’T MISS THE
SEVEN CUPS TEA HOUSE
GRAND OPENING

to benefit the Academy for Cancer Wellness

Academy for Cancer Wellness

Seven Cups Tea House in Tucson, Arizona

Sunday, October 10th, 2004
Open house from 2:00pm to 6:00pm
Ticket price: $18.00 (tax deductible)

  • Ribbon Cutting Ceremony with the Tucson Chamber of Commerce
  • Photo signing: Theresa Nguyen, Miss Asia Arizona and Miss Asia International

  • Tea tasting accompanied by light refreshments

  • Lion dancers will perform an opening business ceremony

  • Internationally renowned Norman Walker Chinese Folk Dance Video

  • Teacher-choreographer from Cecily’s Dance Studio

  • Tai Chi demonstrations

  • Aleck McKinnon, Head Horticulturalist from Tucson Botanical Gardens will demonstrate and teach

Celebrating the Seven Cups Tea House Grand Opening – all proceeds from this event will benefit the Academy for Cancer Wellness to assist under-insured cancer patients. The Academy for Cancer Wellness is a 501(c)3 non-profit charitable organization. Its mission is to enhance the awareness of cancer champions (people who survive). Dr Alice F. Chang is a cancer survivor/champion who is a licensed psychologist specializing in health psychology.

For more information, please contact:

Dr Alice F. Chang, Academy for Cancer Wellness
AFChang@cancerhealth.org
(520) 722-4581
Austin Hodge, Seven Cups
sales@sevencups.com
(520) 881-4072