Laowushan (Laowu Mountain)

Loose Leaf Sheng Puer 2009

The extraordinarily large leaves of this tea come from old-growth tea trees in Laowushan (Laowu Mountain). With a complex flavor reminiscent of the highland rainforest where it grows, savory and sweet notes of honeycomb, fresh wood and dried fruit stand out. All the depth of a traditional sheng puer, yet a very smooth and dark delivery due to its age.

$23.50

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Tea Origin
Laowushan, Zhengyuan County, Pu'er City, Yunnan Province, China

Tea Bush
Wenli Daye Quntizhong (Wenli Large Leaf Heirloom Tea Tree)

Tea Master
Gong Liping and Ran Yijun

Harvest Time
Early April

Picking Standard
One bud, two leaves

The extraordinarily large and thick leaves of this tea come from old-growth tea trees in Laowushan (Laowu Mountain), one of the classic six famous mountain origins for puer tea. With a complex flavor reminiscent of the highland rainforest where it grows, savory and sweet notes of honeycomb, fresh wood and dried fruit stand out. The underlying strength of this medium-bodied tea possesses all the depth of a traditional sheng puer, yet a very smooth delivery due to its age. Its character has darkened over time even while it retains a lingering brightness and a sweet return. Its yellow-green leaves produce a bright golden brew with a rich fullness which turns darker in later infusions. The initial astringency quickly turns to persistent sweetness, and the fragrance of mountain herbs and wildflowers clings to the bottom of the cup.

Unique “wicker tea” from Laowushan

A Laowu tea grove. The trees have long thin branches.
A Laowu tea grove. The trees have long thin branches.

Laowushan tea makers cultivate the tea leaves from the local variety of tea tree, Wenli Daye Quntizhong (Wenli Large Leaf Heirloom Tea Tree), which looks quite different from most other Yunnan tea trees. Tea made from these trees is often called “rattan tea” or “wicker tea” on the market because of the trees’ long, slender branches that dance in the wind and bend like wicker. Local people also refer to it as “dancing tea” because of this.

Old tea mountain origins

A massive Laowu puer tea tree with a thick trunk and long thin branches.
A massive Laowu puer tea tree with a thick trunk and long thin branches.

Laowushan is a highly respected origin which has been cultivating and producing tea since the Tang Dynasty (618-907). It has a large population of old-growth tea trees, both forest-grown and cultivated, mainly distributed around the villages of Luojia, Wenli, and Nabu. The lofty peaks of Laowushan range in altitude from 1900-2240 meters (roughly 6230-7350 feet) and make up one of the many ranges in the Wuliang Mountains. This region is surrounded by fog and cloud cover year round and covered in lush evergreen broad-leaved forest.

No chemical fertilizer, pesticide, or herbicide was used in the production of this tea. Click here to read more about our promise to fair trade and the environment.

Laowushan (Laowu Mountain) 2009 brewing guidelines

5 grams (2 Tb) tea

12 oz 100°C (212ºF) water

3 min. first infusion

At least 5 infusions: 3, 3, 5, 8, 10 minutes